Cairaguas (cairaguas) wrote in songlations,
Cairaguas
cairaguas
songlations

"Llegará la Tormenta" by Amaral, English translation of lyrics

"The Storm Will Come"
Style: Bob Dylan tribute
Country: Spain

Me han dicho que has vuelto por fin a tu casa.
¿Qué has visto en tu viaje por tierras lejanas?


They have told me that you've finally returned home.
What have you seen in your travel through far away lands?

Caí entre la bruma de doce montañas,
Vagando por seis autopistas cortadas,
En medio de siete bosques callados,
Perdido en las costas de negros océanos.
Subí a diez mil millas hasta un camposanto.


I fell through the mist of a dozen mountains,
Wandering through six closed highways,
In between seven quiet forests,
Lost in the coasts of black oceans.
I went up ten thousand miles until reaching sacred ground (a graveyard).

Llegará, llegará, llegará,
Llegará la tormenta~
Que anuncia el cielo.


It will come, it will come, it will come,
It will come, the storm~
That the sky announces.

Me han dicho que has vuelto por fin a tu casa.
¿Qué oíste en tu viaje por tierras lejanas?


They have told me that you've finally returned home.
What did you hear in your travel through far away lands?

El ruido de un trueno preludio del miedo,
La última ola al final de los tiempos,
Tambores sonando en la linea de fuego,
Y tantos susurros que no escucha nadie.


The noise of a crack, prelude to fear,
The last wave at the end of times,
Drums sounding in the line of fire,
And so many whispers that nobody hears.

Oí carcajadas y llantos de hambre,
La triste canción del poeta en la calle,
La voz de un payaso cubierto de sangre.


I heard cackles and cries of hunger,
The sad song of the poet on the street,
The voice of a clown covered in blood.

Y llegará, llegará, llegará,
Llegará la tormenta~
Que anuncia el cielo.

(x2)

And it will come, it will come, it will come,
It will come, the storm~
That the sky announces.
(x2)

Me han dicho que has vuelto por fin a tu casa.
¿Y qué harás ahora que el viaje se acaba?


They have told me that you've finally returned home.
And what will you do now that the voyage ends?

Volver antes de la lluvia de estrellas,
A lo más profundo de lo desconocido,
Donde hay multitudes sin nada en las manos,
Allí donde el sol ha secado los ríos.


Return before the rain of stars,
To the farthest end of the unknown,
Where there are multitudes without anything in hand,
There where the sun has dried the rivers.

Donde eres esclavo o un pobre fugitivo
Que ha visto los ojos de un hombre sin rostro,
Donde todas las almas han sido olvidadas,
Donde negro es el color y el número no existe.


Where you are either a slave or a poor fugitive
Who has seen the eyes of a man without a face,
Where all the souls have been forgotten,
Where black is the color and the number does not exist.

Gritaré hasta que quede grabado en el viento
Y mi voz se refleje desde ésta montaña,
Aunque tenga que andar encima de las aguas,
Hasta que ésta llamada sea escuchada.


I will yell until it stays recorded in the wind
And my voice is reflected all the way from this mountain,
Though I may have to walk over waters,
Until this call is heard.

Sí llegará, llegará, llegará,
Llegará la tormenta~
Que anuncia el cielo.

(x2)

Yes, it will come, it will come, it will come,
It will come, the storm~
That the sky announces.
(x2)

Translation Notes:

Vagando por seis autopistas cortadas
Wandering through six closed highways

cortar [verb] = to cut [lit.]

Bob Dylan's "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall" (the song Amaral based this on) says: I've walked and I've crawled on six crooked highways.

---

Subí a diez mil millas hasta un camposanto.
I went up ten thousand miles until reaching sacred ground (a graveyard).

Note that camposanto does actually mean "graveyard," plain and simple. Separating the words campo santo gives you "sacred ground" (or "holy field") and I liked the poetic flow of that, so I left it in to preserves the connotation. It is not much of a stretch since "sacred ground" refers to graveyards in English, too.

---

En medio de siete bosques callados
In between seven quiet forests
In between seven quieted forests [lit.]

---

¿Qué oíste en tu viaje por tierras lejanas?
What did you hear in your travel through far away lands?
What did you hear in your voyage through distant lands?

---

El ruido de un trueno preludio del miedo
The noise of a crack, prelude to fear

trueno [noun, m.] = clap of thunder; gunshot

---

Y tantos susurros que no escucha nadie
And so many whispers that nobody hears [preferred]
And so many whispers that no one hears anything [maybe]

---

A lo más profundo de lo desconocido

To the farthest end of the unknown
To the deepest (most profound) end of the unknown [lit.]

---

Gritaré hasta que quede grabado en el viento
I will yell until it stays recorded in the wind [most practical translation]
I will yell until it stays etched in the wind [pretty and visual translation]

It should be "recorded" because grabar (to record) is used when talking about sound and video. It can also mean "to engrave" or "to etch," usually when talking about physical material like glass or stone. Grabar en la memoria means "to burn to memory."

---

Aunque tenga que andar encima de las aguas
Though I may have to walk over waters
Though I may have to go/be over/above waters

andar [verb] = to go, but is it also used as an active form of "to be"

e.g.:
Ella está feliz. = She is happy. (Describes her state of mind, whether or not she shows it.)
Ella anda feliz. = She goes happy; she is going around being happy. (Describes her demeanor.)

Watch and Listen:

At YouTube here. This is a tribute to Bob Dylan's A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall. The lyrics are similar in many parts, but with slight variations.

By the way, I started a Twitter account for update announcements in case that's easier for those of you who don't use LiveJournal regularly. :-)
Tags: amaral
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